Temperatures to plunge to -10C TODAY after 'Troll of Trondheim'

Temperatures to plunge to -10C TODAY: Health chiefs advise people warm their homes to at least 18C to cope with ice cold snap from the ‘Troll of Trondheim’ after Scotland and the North of England were coated in snow

  • Arctic winds will bring a brutally bitter -10C chill to Britain overnight
  • Met Office has issued a yellow warning for parts of Wales and Northern Ireland
  • It is also in place for England’s east coast, northern Scotland and Western Isles 
  • People recommended to warm homes to at least 18C after cold weather alert  
  • So-called ‘Troll from Trondheim’ will bring ‘widespread and severe frosts’

The UK is bracing itself for an ice cold snap from the ‘Troll of Trondheim’ with temperatures predicted to sink as low as -10C overnight. 

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for parts of Wales, Northern Ireland, England’s east coast, northern Scotland and the Western Isles. 

Forecasters say Arctic air will move in from Wednesday evening, with the UK Health and Security Agency issuing a cold weather alert recommending people warm their homes to at least 18C. 

The Met Office said on Twitter: ‘If you haven’t already, it’s time to dig out the winter hats, gloves and scarves – as Wednesday is looking cold.’

Meanwhile, Forecaster Oli Claydon said: ‘Day to day we are in cold conditions already with that north-easterly flow, but conditions are set to get colder through the week, with the worst showers across northern Scotland but also bringing much colder conditions across all the UK.

Traffic on the A939 Cockbridge to Tomintoul road yesterday morning as snow fell on the higher routes with more snow forecast tonight for the whole of the Highlands

Snow covers part of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and there is a weather warning for more snow tonight. Pictured: A car drives in the snow at Glenshee, near Braemar, Aberdeenshire

The UK is bracing itself for an ice cold snap with temperatures predicted to sink as low as -10C overnight. Pictured: Precipitation chart for today

‘Overnight lows of minus 10 to -11 in areas where we do get snow in those rural parts of Scotland, with temperatures down to -six in rural England. 

‘Cold conditions to remain through the weekend. Signs of warmer weather moving in from the southwest from Tuesday next week.

‘But the signs are that the cold weather will hold in the north of the UK, so there will be a split between north and south.’ 

People should expect snow showers and ice to cause travel disruption and a risk of slippery surfaces. 

Meanwhile, warnings will remain in place until Thursday afternoon, but the cold weather will not begin to shift until early next week. 

Age UK has advised maintaining a supply of food and medicine to reduce the number of outdoor trips and torches with spare batteries in case of a power cut. Homeless people in London are to be sheltered after the Severe Weather Emergency Protocol (SWEP) was activated for the first time this winter to provide emergency accommodation for rough sleepers.   

Matt Peddle walking his dog Molly at Glenshee, near Braemar, Aberdeenshire

Forecasters issued the second highest level of alert – amber – with wintry showers and snow predicted to hit from Wednesday evening until next Monday. The amber warning is triggered when temperatures drop to an average of 2C or below for at least 48 hours

A snow plough driving through the Cumbrian town of Nenthead at the weekend

Scotland and the North of England were coated in snow yesterday morning as a cold snap dubbed the ‘Troll from Trondheim’ blows in – bringing daytime temperatures down to around zero and as low as -10C in parts of the country. 

The Met Office warned that ‘widespread and potentially severe frosts’ were expected as the brutally bitter deep freeze, which is named after the city in central Norway, blasts the UK.

Forecasters issued the second highest level of alert – amber – with wintry showers and snow predicted to hit from Wednesday evening until next Monday. The amber warning is triggered when temperatures drop to an average of 2C or below for at least 48 hours.

It is one level below an emergency red alert and advises the infirm, elderly and vulnerable to take special precautions to stay warm. GPs have been warned to ‘expect a surge in demand’.

Temperatures in parts of the Scottish Highlands could plunge to as low as -10C this week.

What is a level 3 cold weather alert? 

The Met Office has triggered a level 3, or amber, cold weather alert warning of severe conditions in England from 6pm tomorrow to 9am on Monday December 12. 

The alert means the cold weather could increase health risks to vulnerable people and it requires social and healthcare services to take action to protect high-risk groups.

The Met Office said air from the Arctic will spread south across the country from late tomorrow evening with very cold nights expected as well as frosts.

Wintry showers are also likely in coastal areas bringing risks of icy patches on roads.

Met Office forecaster Dan Stroud said: ‘We’ve got a spell of showers feeding into North Sea coastal areas during Tuesday. They will turn increasingly wintry across parts of northern Scotland, with accumulations on higher ground.

‘Elsewhere, while sunny, there will be a cold feel, with temperatures just below average.

‘But with some strong winds it’s going to feel a lot cooler than it actually is.

‘Into Tuesday night an organised band of showers will sink south, (with) that wind changing direction and coming in from the north, turning it colder with an increasing risk of some frost, mainly in central and western areas.

‘Once that wind rears around to the north, we’re going to pull in that colder arctic air, so the story will be about cold and frost.’

Mr Stroud said day temperatures will range between 4-6C in the north, reaching highs of 8C in the south, while it will drop to as low as -6C on Tuesday night.

He added: ‘Into Wednesday, (there will be) frequent showers across north Scotland, some of those locally heavy, with snow away from the coast. Some accumulations are possible.

‘It will start to feel very cold, with wintry showers moving in to parts of Northern Ireland and eastern England.’

Met Office deputy chief meteorologist Rebekah Sherwin said: ‘We can expect to see some snow and wintry showers further south as the week progresses, particularly in coastal areas or over higher ground.

‘There will be widespread frosts with temperatures falling to as low as minus 10C overnight in isolated spots by the end of the week.’

Downing Street on Monday said it was confident the UK has sufficient energy supplies to get through the cold snap.


Temperatures set to plummet Wednesday (left) and Thursday (right)

Temperatures in London will drop to -2C on Friday as a cold snap hits the country  

Brett Hills trudges through the snow yesterday morning on his way to work near Tomintoul

Temperatures in parts of the Scottish Highlands could plunge to as low as -10C this week. Pictured: Traffic on the A939 Cockbridge to Tomintoul road

Met Office forecaster Dan Stroud said: ‘We’ve got a spell of showers feeding into North Sea coastal areas during Tuesday. They will turn increasingly wintry across parts of northern Scotland, with accumulations on higher ground’

Mr Stroud said day temperatures will range between 4-6C in the north, reaching highs of 8C in the south, while it will drop to as low as -6C overnight

Drivers ‘needlessly putting themselves at risk’ by ignoring red weather warnings 

More than one in six motorists (18%) admit they would not change their driving plans despite a red weather warning, a new survey suggests.

The AA, which commissioned the poll of 13,000 drivers, said people who ignore alerts about treacherous conditions are ‘needlessly putting themselves and their passengers at risk’.

Red warnings are issued by the Met Office when ‘dangerous weather is expected’, which could include snow, storms and strong winds.

The company says it is very likely there will be ‘a risk to life’ when these warnings are active, so people should ‘avoid travelling where possible’.

The UK’s last red warning for wintry weather was issued in February during Storm Eunice.

The results of the AA poll, shared with the PA news agency, also indicate that three-quarters (75%) of drivers would not change their plans for amber weather warnings, which are issued when there is ‘an increased likelihood of impacts from severe weather’.

High fuel costs and severe roadworks appear to be more off-putting to drivers, with the proportion of respondents who said they would alter their itinerary for those reasons being 65% and 52% respectively.

Forecasts suggest there will be widespread overnight frosts and the UK’s first major snow of the winter in parts of Scotland on Wednesday, with ‘blizzard conditions’ bringing accumulations of up to 10cm.

The Met Office has issued an amber warning for the entire day.

A sharp drop in temperatures usually leads to an increase in vehicle breakdowns of 8-10%, according to the AA.

Mark Born, head of training at the AA Driving School, said: ‘Winter weather brings challenging road conditions as storms and fog bring poor visibility, while wind, rain and snow can make road surfaces difficult to navigate with an increased risk of debris on the road.

‘Whether you’re a new or experienced driver, always drive to the conditions and allow extra time for your journey as there may be delays.’

He urged drivers to pack ‘winter essentials’ in their cars, such as warm and waterproof clothes, a shovel, a torch, a fully charged mobile phone and a flask of hot drink.

The AA poll also indicated that 19% of drivers would not change their plans if their car displayed a red dashboard warning light, such as for a battery issue.

Some 58% of respondents would ignore amber lights, which include the ‘check engine’ symbol.

Dr Agostinho Sousa, consultant in public health medicine at the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), said older people and those with heart or lung conditions are particularly at risk from the cold weather, adding: ‘If you have a pre-existing medical condition, you should heat your home to a temperature that is comfortable for you.

‘In rooms you mostly use, such as the living room or bedroom, try to heat them to at least 18C if you can. Keep your bedroom windows closed at night. Wearing several layers of clothing will keep you warmer than one thicker layer.’

In 2020 more than 28,000 people are thought to have died from cold weather. 

The National Grid said it remained ‘cautiously confident’ electricity supplies would be adequate in the week ahead as temperatures plunge. 

The RAC has advised motorists to check their vehicles are ‘winter ready’, with properly inflated tyres that have good tread.

Spokesperson Rod Dennis said: ‘With temperatures plummeting this week, many drivers might be taken aback by the cold after an exceptionally mild autumn.

‘Drivers with older batteries in their cars might also wish to give their vehicle a 20-minute drive before colder conditions arrive to ensure the battery can cope with sub-zero temperatures.’

It comes as more than one in six motorists admit they would not change their driving plans despite a red weather warning, a new survey suggests.

The AA, which commissioned the poll of 13,000 drivers, said people who ignore alerts about treacherous conditions are ‘needlessly putting themselves and their passengers at risk’.

Red warnings are issued by the Met Office when ‘dangerous weather is expected’, which could include snow, storms and strong winds.

The company says it is very likely there will be ‘a risk to life’ when these warnings are active, so people should ‘avoid travelling where possible’.

The UK’s last red warning for wintry weather was issued in February during Storm Eunice.

The results of the AA poll, shared with the PA news agency, also indicate that three-quarters (75 per cent) of drivers would not change their plans for amber weather warnings, which are issued when there is ‘an increased likelihood of impacts from severe weather’.

High fuel costs and severe roadworks appear to be more off-putting to drivers, with the proportion of respondents who said they would alter their itinerary for those reasons being 65 per cent and 52 per cent respectively.

Mark Born, head of training at the AA Driving School, said: ‘Winter weather brings challenging road conditions as storms and fog bring poor visibility, while wind, rain and snow can make road surfaces difficult to navigate with an increased risk of debris on the road.

‘Whether you’re a new or experienced driver, always drive to the conditions and allow extra time for your journey as there may be delays.’

He urged drivers to pack ‘winter essentials’ in their cars, such as warm and waterproof clothes, a shovel, a torch, a fully charged mobile phone and a flask of hot drink.

The Met Office has advised people to try and maintain indoor temperatures of at least 18°C (64.4F), stating that this is particularly relevant for those who are not mobile, have a long-term illness or are 65 or over.

Cold temperatures were thought to be responsible for 28,300 deaths in England and Wales between December 2019 and March 2020. ‘Simple preventative action’ could have prevented many of the deaths, according to the Government’s cold weather plan for England 2022/2023.

A car drives through Nenthead in Cumbria at the weekend amid an Arctic blast

High pressure means sunny spells are set to dominate by midweek but the clear skies are set to mean harsh frosts with temperatures set to fall as low as -6C in the Pennines on Thursday night

How to prepare for cold snap: Check your tyres and keep your rooms warm 

The RAC has advised motorists to check their vehicles are ‘winter ready’, with properly inflated tyres that have good tread.

The Met Office has advised people to try and maintain indoor temperatures of at least 18C, stating that this is particularly relevant for those who are not mobile, have a long-term illness or are 65 or over.

It has also asked people to ‘look out for friends and family who may be vulnerable to the cold’, ensuring they have access to warm food and drinks and are managing to heat their homes adequately.

The cold weather plan warns ‘Excess deaths are not just deaths of those who would have died anyway in the next few weeks or months due to illness or old age.

‘There is strong evidence that some of these winter deaths are indeed ‘extra’ and are related to cold temperatures and living in cold homes as well as infectious diseases such as influenza. 

‘In the recent past, the rate of winter deaths in England was twice the rate observed in some northern European countries, such as Finland.’

The Met Office’s long range forecast suggests that the cold snap may not last until Christmas and the New Year, when it could get milder, although wetter and windier in southern and western areas. The long range forecast predicts that the north and east are ‘most likely to hold on to colder conditions for longest’.

Downing Street said it is confident that the UK has sufficient energy supplies, as the country braces for severe cold weather in the coming days.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: ‘The UK has a diverse energy supply via renewables or otherwise. So we are confident we have diverse supply.’

The spokesman said the Government had never sought to be ‘prescriptive’ with advice for the public.

‘The Government has for some time now provided advice to the public should they wish to find ways to save energy – that’s available in the Help for Households website.’

He added that the Government would be launching a campaign to ‘further boost’ that information.

The Met Office’s cold weather alert system operates in England from November 1 to March 31 in association with the UKHSA.

The system has five levels of response based on cold weather thresholds designed to trigger an alert when severe cold weather is likely to significantly affect people’s health.

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