Sky’s Kay Burley kicks Tory MP David Davies off TV debate on Brexit

Can they agree on ANYTHING? Brexiteer Tory MP is kicked off live TV debate as he ‘patronisingly’ checks his phone while Remainer Labour MP speaks – after they argue over who has most airtime

  • Tory MP and Brexiteer David Davies had a fiery clash with Labour’s Anna Turley
  • He adopted a bored tone and pulled out his phone halfway through interview 
  • Kay Burley accused the MP of being ‘patronising’ and kicked him off the show 
  • MPs are at war over Brexit with ministers  floating alternatives to the PM’s plan 
  • Theresa May said the crunch Brexit vote will be delayed until post Christmas 
  • In farcical scenes, Labour ditched a threat to call a no confidence vote in the PM  
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A Tory MP was kicked off a live TV debate on Brexit today after he ‘patronised’ a female politician by checking his mobile phone in the middle of the debate.

David Davies, a Brexiteer, went head to head against Labour MP and Remainer Anna Turley on Sky News this afternoon to debate Britain’s looming departure.

But the two MPs descended into a bad-tempered argument as they clashed over what Brexit will mean for jobs and the economy.

Halfway through the interview, Mr Davies adopted a bored look and pulled out and checked his mobile phone after complaining he could not get a word in.

Turning to Ms Turley and presenter Kay Burley, he said: ‘You carry on, I’ll check my phone while you have your little chat’, and pulled his mobile out of his suit pocket.

Kay then interrupted to slap down the MP, saying: ‘Don’t be patronising. That is completely unacceptable. Please don’t talk to her like that.’

Mr Davies retorted: ‘I am not being patronising but I can’t get a word in edge ways here.’

Kay hit back saying: ‘Please don’t talk to her in that fashion, it is not acceptable. You have had 50 per cent each.’ The clearly irritated Tory MP buttoned up his suit jacket, he added: ‘OK, you two carry on.’

Kay then stepped in to kick him off her set, shaking his hand and steering him away with the words: ‘Thanks for joining us, we really appreciate it.’ 

MPs are bitterly divided over Brexit and Parliament is in total deadlock over what to do – despite calls from the public for MPs to stop squabbling and back a plan.


Tory MP David Davies was kicked off a live TV debate on Brexit today after he ‘patronised’ Labour MP Anna Turley (pictured together today on the show)  by checking his mobile phone in the middle of the fiery debate 


David Davies (pictured today with Anna Turley and Kay Burley)  moaned that he could not get a work in edge ways during the showdown – but was accused of being patronising by Kay Burley 


David Davis then walks across the set after being asked to leave for patronising the Labour MP (pictured) 

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The awkward encounter came after the two MPs clashed repeatedly over Brexit in the fiery afternoon showdown.

Ms Turley, Labour MP for Redcar, has warned that Brexit threatens crucial manufacturing jobs in her constituency.

May says Commons vote on her Brexit deal will NOT happen before Christmas

Theresa May today insisted the Commons vote on her Brexit deal will not happen before Christmas – despite howls of protests from Remainers and Eurosceptics.

The PM said she is still hoping to secure more ‘political and legal assurances’ from the EU on the Irish border backstop, and as a result the showdown in Parliament will not take place until the week commencing January 14. 

Appealing for MPs to get behind her plan, Mrs May said European counterparts had made clear ‘they do not want to use’ the insurance policy in the agreement. 

She also delivered a stinging rebuke to those calling for a second referendum, saying it would only lead to ‘disaster’. 

The defiant statement to the Commons comes as Mrs May wrestles to stop the Cabinet descending into chaos, with ministers openly floating alternatives to her Brexit plan. 

Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd today risked directly contradicting the PM by insisting ‘nothing should be off the table’ if the government’s plan is rejected by the Commons.

Business Secretary Greg Clark also backed demands for MPs to vote on a range of ‘options’.

However, Mrs May again flatly dismissed the idea of a referendum this afternoon.

Mrs May is understood to be resisting calls for the Commons to vote on a series of Brexit options, amid fears it would merely plunge the process deeper into turmoil.   

Mr Davies had insisted the UK ‘will be better out of the European Union.

He added: ‘I find it bizarre  that you say you will be losing jobs while at the same time you are saying there won’t be enough people to fill all the jobs available if we leave the European Union and don’t have a visa scheme.’

Their showdown came on yet another day of bitter Brexit clashes in Parliament as a deal which can get the backing of a majority of MPs remains a distant prospect.

Mrs May was hauled back to the Commons today to defend her deal in yet another statement to MPs after the EU summit last week – where her pleas for Brussels to ditch the hated Irish backstop were snubbed. 

She insisted that she is still hoping to get a legally binding change to the backstop – widely seen as an absolute must for her deal to stand any chance of getting through. 

Mrs May also warned it would be a ‘disaster’ to call a second referendum – despite reports her senior aides have been secretly discussing calling the vote behind her back. 

And she confirmed the Commons vote on her Brexit deal will not happen before Christmas.

But Remainers and Brexiteers both rounded on the PM – lashing her deal and demanding drastic changes to her Brexit plan.

Arch Remainer Nicky Morgan demanded that MPs cancel their Christmas holiday and sit throughout the festive period to thrash out a way forward.

There are just 102 days to go until Brexit, but with Mrs May’s deal looking set to be overwhelmingly defeated when it comes to a vote in the New Year, Britain’s Brexit plans are in total chaos.

Brexiteers are urging for the UK to adopt a ‘managed no deal’ strategy to ensure the country exits the Brussels bloc by the end of March next year.  

While Remainers are seizing on the chaos to ramp up their demands for another referendum – dubbed a ‘Peoples Vote’.

And deep divisions at the heart of the Cabinet have erupted into the open.

In extraordinary scenes, ministers have been openly breaking ranks with No10 and floating alternatives to her Brexit plan. 


Viewers of the bad-tempered showdown were left in despair at the Brexit row – which comes as Britain is just 102 days away from leaving the EU and Parliament still in deadlock over what to do


Another viewer noted that anyone tuning in to watch MPs debate Brexit were met with chaotic scenes


Theresa May (pictured in the Commons today) will warn that a second Brexit referendum would cause ‘irreparable damage’ to Britain, as she tries to defuse anger at the news that her own aides have floated the idea 


With Theresa May’s deal set to be voted down when it goes to the Commons in the New year, Britain faces the prospect of another referendum , a General Election or another Brexit deal

Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd today risked directly contradicting the PM by insisting ‘nothing should be off the table’ if the government’s plan is rejected by the Commons – effectively saying a second referendum could be held.

Business Secretary Greg Clark also backed demands for MPs to vote on a range of ‘options’. 

One Cabinet group, including Philip Hammond, Mr Clark and Ms Rudd, are pushing for the Commons to be allowed to vote on a range of Brexit deal options.

Corbyn abandons threat to call a stunt vote of no confidence in May after less than an hour

Jeremy Corbyn abandoned an attempt to call a stunt vote of no confidence in Theresa May in less than an hour today.

Labour has repeatedly demanded the Prime Minister call the postponed vote on her Brexit deal before Christmas despite knowing it would be defeated by a landslide. 

Labour sources insisted at around 3pm Mr Corbyn would demand a confidence vote in Mrs May if she failed to set a date in her statement to MPs today.

But after Mrs May said the showdown would be held in the week beginning January 14 the Labour leader never made his move in his own speech at around 3.45pm.

Despite the bizarre sequence of events, a Labour spokesman insisted Mrs May only announced a date ‘under threat of a motion of no confidence in her’.

Downing Street said last week the vote would be held in mid January. Mrs May today only confirmed which week it would happen.  

This would include the option of holding a second referendum and a Norway-style relationship – meaning MPs could seize control of the talks to push through a soft Brexit or stop it altogether.

In the clearest public statement yet, Mr Clark told the BBC today that if Mrs May’s deal falls ‘Parliament should be invited to say what it would agree with’.

Although, he cautioned against a second referendum, saying it would ‘continue the uncertainty for many more months’. 

But harder line Brexiteers believe an ‘options’ vote would just be cover for delaying or cancelling Brexit. 

Mrs May’s authority was dealt a hammer blow last week after MPs mounted a cinfidence vote to try to oust her.

She survived, but over a third of her MPs voted to oust her – a far bigger rebellion than Number Ten had feared.

Meanwhile, Labour’s position was plunged into chaos today as they announced they would mount a no confidence vote in the PM – only to abandon the stunt less than an hour later. 

Labour has repeatedly demanded the Prime Minister call the postponed vote on her Brexit deal before Christmas despite knowing it would be defeated by a landslide. 

Labour sources insisted at around 3pm Mr Corbyn would demand a confidence vote in Mrs May if she failed to set a date in her statement to MPs today.

But after Mrs May said the showdown would be held in the week beginning January 14 the Labour leader never made his move in his own speech at around 3.45pm.

Despite the bizarre sequence of events, a Labour spokesman insisted Mrs May only announced a date ‘under threat of a motion of no confidence in her’.

Downing Street said last week the vote would be held in mid January. Mrs May today only confirmed which week it would happen.  

In the Commons this afternoon, Mrs May also all but ruled out holding a second vote while she remains in charge.

Simple vote could extend Article 50, says government lawyer 

Parliament could extend Article 50 to buy more time before Brexit by holding a simple vote, the government’s legal advisor has said.

It is believed that Article 50, the mechanism for leaving the EU, would have to be extended beyond March 29 if Britain decides to hold a second referendum.

Robert Buckland said extension would not require fresh legislation, just a one-off vote in the Commons.

Scrapping Article 50 altogether would, however, require new legislation, Mr Buckland told Radio 4’s Westminster Hour.

He said: ‘I think the better view would be that legislation would be necessary. I think we would have to repeal the EU Withdrawal Act.

‘Revocation is one thing but delaying Article 50 is another matter that can be done by a minister laying a statutory instrument to vary exit day – it’s there as part of a power.’

Mr Buckland also suggested MPs could be given a free vote on the Brexit way forward.

‘I think if all the parties agreed to it then it’s something that might well work, but I think it would be imbalanced if one party did it and the other did not,’ he said.

Another referendum would ‘likely leave us no further forward than the last… and further divide our country at the very moment we should be working to unite it’, she warned. 

She added: ‘Let us not break faith with the British people by trying to stage another referendum, another vote which would do irreparable damage to the integrity of our politics, because it would say to millions who trusted in democracy that our democracy does not deliver.’

Her intervention came amid mounting anger over the revelation that chief-of-staff Gavin Barwell and deputy David Lidington had backed the idea of a second referendum.

MPs and ministers reacted furiously to reports yesterday that Mr Barwell had told colleagues a second poll was ‘the only way forward’ in the light of opposition to her Brexit deal. 

On social media messages yesterday, Mr Barwell said he was not planning for a second referendum.

Mr Lidington also raised eyebrows after it emerged he held secret talks last week with Labour MPs in favour of another poll.

Despite the denials, Cabinet sources complained that the rumours had the ‘ring of truth’.  

Remainers condemned the government for trying to ‘run down the clock’. 

Former minister Sam Gyimah said: ‘Downing St has stopped selling the PMs flawed deal. 

‘Instead we have displacement activity designed to distract from last weeks failed renegotiation. 

‘And a concerted attempt to discredit every plausible alternative as they run down the clock. This is not in the national interest.’ 

‘I think, obviously, it’s important once the Prime Minister has finished her negotiations with other European leaders and the Commission that Parliament votes on that.

‘If that were not to be successful, we do need to have agreement – we can’t just have continuing uncertainty and I think Parliament should be invited to say what it would agree with, and that’s something that I think businesses up and down the country would expect elected members to take responsibility, rather than just be critics.’ 


Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) abandoned an attempt to call a stunt vote of no confidence in Theresa May in less than an hour today

What Brexit options could MPs vote on if May’s deal fails?

More than half a dozen Cabinet ministers are pushing for Parliament to vote on ‘options’ for how to proceed if Theresa May’s deal fails.

Here are some of the possibilities that could be considered:

NORWAY PLUS

MPs from across parties have been mooting the idea of a Norway model.

It would effectively keep the UK in the single market, with a customs bolt-on to avoid a hard Irish border, and backers say it would keep Britain close to the EU while cutting contributions to Brussels.

However, critics say it has the drawbacks of keeping free movement, – and tightly limiting the possibilities for doing trade deals elsewhere.

The EU is also thought to have concerns about a country the UK’s size joining the EEA, while other states in the group might be resistant.

SECOND REFERENDUM 

The so-called ‘People’s Vote’ campaign has been pushing hard for another national vote, with cross-party backing.

MPs would almost certainly want to be asked to back the idea in principle. 

The Article 50 process would probably need to be extended to facilitate a referendum, but the EU seems open to that possibility.

However, the biggest problem is likely to be that even if the Commons can agree on holding a vote, they will be be completely split over the question.

Some want it to be a rerun of 2016 with Remain v Leave. Others say it should be May’s deal against no deal.

There are also those who support two rounds of voting, or multiple choice. 

CANADA PLUS

Brexiteers have been demanding the UK takes a different approach this time, seeking a looser Canada-style arrangement with the EU. 

The arrangement they want would be a relatively clean break from the EU, with the ability to strike trade agreements elsewhere.

But it would fall far short of the low-friction access urged by Labour and large numbers of Tories. 

MANAGED NO DEAL

Brexiteers have been floating a ‘managed’ no deal which could feature in the votes.

It would involve the UK offering the EU billions of pounds to secure a transition period, even if there is no wider deal.

However, there is little sign that the EU is ready to agree. 

 

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