Radio adverts warning Brits to prepare for a no deal Brexit are aired

Radio adverts warning Brits to prepare for a no deal Brexit are aired amid growing fears political deadlock will send the UK crashing out of the bloc

  • The emergency adverts began being aired on radio stations across the UK today
  • They urge Britons to visit the government’s website to prepare for no deal Brexit
  • Theresa May’s Brexit plan is expected to be voted down by MPs on January 15 
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Adverts warning the public to prepare themselves for a no deal Brexit have today begun being aired on radio amid mounting fears the UK will crash out of the bloc.

The Government has paid for the emergency ads to be aired as part of their last tranche of no deal planning signed off by senior ministers late last month.

The ads, which are being aired on commercial radio stations across the UK, comes amid fears warring MPs will not agree a Brexit deal before March 29.

Theresa May’s Brexit plan has been basted by Brexiteers and Remainers and is widely expected to be rejected by MPs when at the crunch Commons vote on January 15. 

In the radio advert, a railway station-style announcement sounds, before people ask a series of questions about Brexit over a tannoy.

The voice asks a series of questions, stating: ‘Will my travel be affected when we leave the EU? What about documents for driving? Will mobile roaming change? Should I check my travel insurance?’

A voice-over then says: ‘You might also have questions about how leaving the EU on the 29th March will affect you. Find guidance and up to date information on gov.uk/EUexit’


The Government has paid for the emergency ads to be aired as part of their last tranche of no deal planning signed off by senior ministers late last month (pictured, Theresa May in Liverpool yesterday launching the NHS 10-year plan)

  • Trucks ‘face six day wait to board ferries at Dover’ if… Dozens of MPs urge police action after officers stood by…

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Ministers have ramped up no deal Brexit planning as Westminster remains in political deadlock over the UK’s future with the EU.

The Government has put 3,500 troops on standby and booked up ferry space to ensure vital supplies such as medical equipment and drugs can get to the UK.

meanwhile, it emerged today that trucks could face a six-day wait to board ferries at Dover if Britain has a no deal Brexit.

May urged to get tough with EU to avoid disastrous defeat on her Brexit deal 

Theresa May is facing calls to ‘play hardball’ with the EU today as she gathers Cabinet with just a week to go before a titanic Commons clash on her Brexit deal.

The PM is still scrambling to win over mutinous MPs as she stares down the barrel of a disastrous defeat in the vote, due to happen next Tuesday.

Irish PM Leo Varadkar has signalled that the EU will give ‘assurances’ that the UK will not be ‘trapped’ in the controversial backstop arrangements designed to avoid a hard border.

But ministers are said to be urging Mrs May to give Parliament the final say on whether the backstop takes effect, as well as the right to exit the Treaty after 12 months if Brussels is not behaving fairly.

A Cabinet source told The Times the government should present the EU with those conditions on a take-it-or-leave-it basis – with no deal the alternative.

However, there are currently few signs that Brussels would agree to those terms. 

Sources have suggested they are instead proposing an ‘exchange of letters’ with Mrs May, setting out the bloc’s intention to conclude a trade deal by 2021.

That timetable would mean the backstop need never come into effect, but experts have voiced scepticism about whether it is possible. 

Lorries will be hit by the delay if new customs checks take just 70 seconds extra per vehicle, the study found.

While if the new checks take 80 seconds then there would be permanent gridlock at the key border crossing.

The findings were exposed in analysis carried out by academics from the University College London for the Department for Transport.

It emerged just a day after officials staged a practice traffic jam to prepare for the possible chaos caused by a no deal Brexit.

But Operation Brock descended into farce as just 89 lorries made it to Manston airfield near Ramsgate for the stunt – fewer than the 150 lorries promised and a fraction of the 4,000 which could use the site in a no deal emergency. 

More than 100 Tory MPs  have voiced their opposition to the PM’s Brexit deal, while the DUP have also vowed to vote it down. 

They are furious at the Irish backstop plan, warning it could keep the UK tied into an EU customs union forever and risks dividing Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK. 

Mrs May is trying to win last-ditch concessions from the EU on the backstop to avoid a disastrous defeat on her deal.  

Irish PM Leo Varadkar has signalled that the EU will give ‘assurances’ that the UK will not be ‘trapped’ in the controversial backstop arrangements designed to avoid a hard border.

But ministers are said to be urging Mrs May to give Parliament the final say on whether the backstop takes effect, as well as the right to exit the Treaty after 12 months if Brussels is not behaving fairly.

A Cabinet source told The Times the government should present the EU with those conditions on a take-it-or-leave-it basis – with no deal the alternative.

However, there are currently few signs that Brussels would agree to those terms. 

Sources have suggested they are instead proposing an ‘exchange of letters’ with Mrs May, setting out the bloc’s intention to conclude a trade deal by 2021.

That timetable would mean the backstop need never come into effect, but experts have voiced scepticism about whether it is possible.    


Trucks could face a six-day wait to board ferries at Dover if Britain has a no deal Brexit, official research has found. It emerged just a day after officials staged a practice traffic jam to prepare for the possible chaos caused by a no deal Brexit (pictured, yesterday near Dover)

From border chaos to drug shortages: The doomsday warnings about a no-deal Brexit 

THE M20 TURNING INTO A ‘GIANT LORRY PARK’

One of the most vivid warnings about no-deal is that a 13-mile stretch of the M20 could become a giant lorry park for years. 

Some 10,000 freight vehicles pass through Dover daily, and the port handles one-sixth of the UK’s total trade in goods.

But imposing checks on them could cause massive tailbacks on both sides of the Channel, and spark shortages. 

Britons could also need insurance for Channel Tunnel disruption if there is no-deal Brexit, the government warned today.  

Guidance on rail says the government is still struggling to agree ‘mutual recognition’ with the EU to avoid disruption to services such as the Eurostar should there be no deal by March. 

MEDICINE SHORTAGES

Contingency plans have been put in place to fly in medical supplies as the NHS braces for six months of chaos if the UK crashes out of the EU.

Crucial supplies could also be diverted to ports away from the Channel, and some drugs may even be rationed.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has revealed the NHS is laying out on huge numbers of refrigeration units to try and keep supplied usable. 

BLACKOUTS IN NORTHERN IRELAND

Northern Ireland faces the threat of electricity blackouts if the UK crashes out of the European Union without a deal.

Negotiators are trying to secure an agreement with Brussels that the current single electricity market would remain intact even if exit talks collapse.

But if the pledge was not secured, customers on both sides of the border could be hit.

The single electricity market involves ‘significant’ flows of power between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Government technical papers said there was a ‘risk’ that the single electricity market ‘may not be able to continue’.

If that happens, the Northern Ireland Utility Regulator, an energy watchdog, will ‘take action to seek to ensure continued security of supply and market stability’, they warned.

MARKET PANIC

Bank of England governor Mark Carney set out one of the most blood-curdling outcomes – while making clear it was a worst case. 

He suggested the size of the economy could plunge by 8 per cent in less than a year – further and faster than the financial crisis of 2008.

At the same time, the unemployment rate would rise 7.5 per cent, meaning hundreds of thousands losing their jobs.

Inflation would surge 6.5 per cent, sending prices in the shops surging House prices could plunge 30 per cent, while commercial property prices are set to fall 48 per cent.

The pound would fall by 25 per cent to less than parity against both the US dollar and the euro.

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