Government shutdown 2021 LIVE – US Senate announces stopgap funding bill to prevent Federal crisis with hours to spare

THE US Senate announced it would vote on a stopgap funding bill Thursday to prevent a government shutdown with just hours to spare, as lawmakers stare down a number of deadlines with massive stakes for the economy and President Joe Biden's sweeping domestic agenda.

The coming days are expected to be the most critical yet of Biden's presidency, as he negotiates the tricky passage of two giant spending bills and a fix to lift the debt ceiling without the support of Republicans.

But the most urgent priority is funding for federal agencies, and Senate Democrats say they will pass temporary legislation early Thursday, hours before the money runs out, to keep the lights on until December 3.

The bill, which includes $6.3 billion to help Afghan refugees and $28.6 billion in disaster aid, is expected to have broad cross-party support and should advance from the House of Representatives to Biden's desk soon after the Senate gives its green light.

"We have agreement on the CR – the continuing resolution – to prevent the government shutdown. And we should be voting on that tomorrow morning," Chuck Schumer, the party's leader in the upper chamber, said late Wednesday.

Shutdowns typically mean hundreds of thousands of government employees being sent home as federal services and properties close.

Read our government shutdown live blog for the latest news and updates…

  • Julia Fields

    COMMON GROUND

    “We have to find our common ground, [be] respectful of each other’s views,” Pelosi said on ABC’s “This Week.”

    “But this isn’t about moderates vs. progressives. Overwhelmingly, the entirety of our caucus, except for a few whose judgment I respect, support the vision of Joe Biden. And we will pass ― make progress on it this week.”

  • Julia Fields

    FEDERAL EMPLOYEES

    Federal employees will most likely feel the strongest effect of the shutdown.

    "You have 2 million civilian employees that are working hard across the country," Max Stier, president of the nonpartisan think tank Partnership for Public Service, told CBSN.

    "You have told all of them that there may be a shutdown — that means that they have to actually stop working on things like the [Montana] train crash or dealing with the economic calamity caused by the pandemic."

  • Julia Fields

    FULL OR PARTIAL?

    According to CBS, "This would be a full shutdown since Congress hasn't yet passed any funding bills.

    "The last shutdown, from December 22, 2018, to January 25, 2019, was a partial closure since Congress had already enacted five of the 12 appropriations bills."

  • Julia Fields

    FURLOUGHED

    Federal workers risk being furloughed during a total shutdown.

    CBS writes "It could be similar in scope to shutdowns in 2013 and in early 2018, when about 850,000 of 2.1 million non-postal federal employees were furloughed, the group estimated.

    "In the 2018 episode, about 380,000 federal workers were furloughed, according to the Partnership for Public Service."

  • Julia Fields

    SMALL BUSINESSES AFFECTED PART 3

    "Finally, those waiting on certain types of capital would have to wait longer.

    "A government shutdown would halt many of the activities currently undertaken by the Small Business Administration which means the thousands of small business loans and grants still being processed for disaster aid, COVID assistance, working capital, and longer-term financing would be significantly delayed, as well as any other assistance the SBA provides, such as counseling and educational services."

  • Julia Fields

    SMALL BUSINESSES AFFECTED PART 2

    "Other small businesses that provide services such as research, consulting, delivery, transportation, technology, landscaping, and construction work to a government-owned facility or agency could also have to wait.

    "Small companies in need of government help would also find themselves in limbo. A government shutdown would essentially stop these types of services that the federal government provides to most firms.

    "So if you’re waiting for a passport, an OSHA safety inspection, a decision on a federal court case, regulatory clearance on a product, or a patent approval, or if you need help from the Internal Revenue Service, you could be twiddling your thumbs for a while."

  • Julia Fields

    SMALL BUSINESSES AFFECTED

    The Philadelphia Inquirer decribes how small businesses can feel the effect of the shutdown.

    It writes that "many small firms that do business — indirectly or directly — with the federal government could see cash flow dry up, at least temporarily.

    "That’s because a shutdown puts a stop to most payments due under federal contracts. So if you’re doing work directly for the federal government or you’re a subcontractor in a federally funded project, any invoices you have coming due would remain open until political differences get resolved."

  • Julia Fields

    BIPARTISANSHIP

    Cori Bush describes what bipartisanship means for these spending packages.

  • Julia Fields

    'RECKLESS AGENDA'

    Senator John Thune does not support the bill, calling it a "reckless agenda."

  • Julia Fields

    'I DON'T KNOW WHAT'S WITH THEM'

    Senator Mazie Hirono has some choice words for Republicans when asked about the debt ceiling.

    “I don’t know what’s with them, except that they don’t give a flying f***!” reports Axios reporter Alayna Greene.

  • Julia Fields

    RISK ON CRYPTOS

    Reporter Susan Li decribes the ways a government shutdown would effect cyrptos.

  • Julia Fields

    HURT EVERY AMERICAN

    Senator Klobuchar argues that defaulting on debt would "hurt every American."

  • Julia Fields

    PELOSI ANSWERS QUESTIONS ON DEBT CEILING

    Nancy Pelosi answered questions about the debt ceiling yesterday.

  • Julia Fields

    HURT FAMILIES AND HELP CHINA

    McConnell claims the Democrat spending plan wil "hurt families and help China."

  • Julia Fields

    'SOMETHING IS WRONG WITH THESE PEOPLE'

    New York Rep Hakeem Jeffries rips Republicans saying "something is wrong with these people."

  • Julia Fields

    STEPHEN COLBERT RIPS MCCONNELL

    Stephen Colbert said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is threatening the nation with “financial Armageddon” by blocking efforts to raise the debt ceiling during his show last night.

    That would cause the U.S. to default on its debt, and could lead to higher prices, massive job losses and a recession, “The Late Show” host noted.

    He went on to compare the politician to the goblin from The Hobbit.

  • Julia Fields

    MAKING LIGHT OF THE SITUATION

    Morning Brew made light of the debate with a comical video meme.

  • Julia Fields

    BERNIE SANDERS ON VOTE

    Bernie Sanders tweeted his thoughts on the vote yesterday, attacking Trump in the meantime.

    "The major corporations want Congress to lift the debt ceiling. Yet, they continue to make massive campaign contributions to the Republican Party which refuses to pay the debt incurred under Trump, and is prepared to plunge the economy into a depression. B***s***!"

  • Julia Fields

    'RECKLESS'

    Rep Spanberger calls a shutdown "reckless."

  • Julia Fields

    'LOONY LIBERAL MATH'

    McConnell dismisses Democrat plan as "loony liberal plan."

  • Julia Fields

    'WORST THING'

    Congressman Krishnamoorthi calls attention to the pandemic that would be negatively impacted by a shutdown.

  • Julia Fields

    SIMPLIFYING THE SHUTDOWN

    The Washington Post TikTok account posted a simplified video to explain the shutdown possibility in the form of a popular trend on the app.

  • Julia Fields

    'F***ING DANCE'

    “We always do this f***ing dance,” said Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.).

    “I don’t know if people are going to put their sane minds on and do what needs to be done, or shut it down.

    "This is just a ridiculous exercise … I can’t even compare it to anything I do on the farm that’s this stupid.”

  • Julia Fields

    'LAST THING WE NEED'

    Senator Warnock describes a shutdown as "the last thing families and small businesses in Georgia need."

  • Julia Fields

    DEMOCRAT'S VIEW

    Democratic California Congressman Adam Schiff sees the government shutdown as a "catastrophe."

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