Ex-AG Schneiderman to lose law license for one year over sex scandal

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Disgraced ex-New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman will have his law license suspended for a year stemming from his sexual harassment and abuse scandal, an appeals court ruled Tuesday.

Schneiderman abruptly resigned in May 2018 amid bombshell allegations by four women that he would get drunk, hit and choke them during sex.

Now, the Appellate Division, First Department has granted a joint agreement between the Attorney Grievance Committee — which filed charges against Schneiderman in August 2020 — and Schneiderman that he be barred from practicing law for one year starting Wednesday.

Schneiderman must also continue mental health treatment and be supervised by the New York City Bar Lawyer Assistance Program, the unanimous decision says.

As part of the AGC’s case, he had to admit to sexual misconduct involving three women with whom he was romantically involved.

While he was in a long-term relationship with one of the victims, he “slapped [her], placed his hands on her neck and applied pressure without obtaining consent, and at times he was verbally and emotionally abusive” on a number of occasions, according to the ruling.

The decision identified the woman as M.B. — apparently referring to accuser and ex-girlfriend Michelle Manning Barish.

Schneiderman also admitted that between August 2016 and September 2017 during a long-term relationship with T.S. — apparently referring to ex-girlfriend Tanya Selvaratnam — he also slapped her, put his hands around her neck and verbally and emotionally abused her, according to the decision.

The state’s former top prosecutor additionally admitted that once in August 2016, during a romantic encounter, he “slapped an unidentified attorney twice,” the ruling reads.

After the allegations publicly surfaced, Schneiderman said he started weekly therapy sessions, did a one-month stint in rehab, joined Alcoholics Anonymous and became a recovering alcoholic.

He publicly apologized in November 2018 after the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office declined to prosecute him — all of which the ruling says are mitigating factors for Schneiderman’s misconduct.

“Respondent’s admitted misconduct involves verbal and emotional abuse, and unwanted physical contact with three women,” the decision reads. “However, respondent does not have any criminal or disciplinary history, he has a significant record of public service, and he has taken steps to address his alcohol abuse and past abusive behavior via his participation in AA and therapy.”

A lawyer for Schneiderman did not immediately return a request for comment.

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