Barlow loses bid to build house in garden of his £6million mansion

Gary Barlow loses bid to build six-bed house in the garden of his £6million country mansion as officials say it would wreck picturesque Cotswold village

  • The Take That start bought the 18th century Grade-II listed home for £2.3million with wife Dawn, in 2007
  • The former X Factor judge asked for planning permission to build a new home in the garden in August 2018
  • Council refused his application yesterday claiming his plans would ‘extend the village’ into the countryside

Gary Barlow purchased the 18th century Grade II-listed home with his wife Dawn (pictured) in 2007, for £2.3million

Gary Barlow’s plans to build a new six-bed home in the garden of his £6million Cotswolds pad have been rejected.

The Take That star purchased the 18th century Grade II-listed home in the quaint village of Alvescot, Oxfordshire, with his wife Dawn in 2007, for £2.3million.

The former X Factor judge asked for planning permission to build a new home – complete with TV snug room, study, and five bathrooms – in the garden, in August 2018.

But the council refused his application on Tuesday, claiming the proposed new house would ‘not respect’ the historic surrounds of the pop star’s nearby home.

Planning chiefs claimed his plans would ‘extend the village’ into the open countryside ‘eroding the setting’.

In the rejection document, the head of planning and strategic housing at the Cotswold-based council added: ‘By reason of the siting of the proposed dwelling and garage being outside of the built-up part of the village, the proposal does not form a logical complement to the existing scale and pattern of development and the character of the area.’

The council refused Mr Barlow’s application on Tuesday, claiming the proposed new house (pictured, plans for the abode) would ‘not respect’ the historic surrounds of the pop star’s nearby home

The former X Factor judge asked for planning permission to build a new home (pictured, the floorplan) – complete with TV snug room, study, and five bathrooms – in the garden, in August 2018

If he’d been given the go ahead, the new house would have been made from Ashlar stone, with Georgian-style sash windows and a tin roof, according to plans. 

The document added: ‘The proposed development would transform the important approach to the settlement and would not contribute to the local distinctiveness and would not enhance the character and quality of the surroundings.

‘Furthermore the proposed development does not respect the Listed Building’s historic curtilage.’

If his planning application was successful it is unclear if Mr Barlow planned to sell the property or rent it out.


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The refusal comes after the singer was given the go-ahead to build a family area, changing rooms, a relaxation zone, and a gym at his existing Cotswolds home in 2015.

Mr Barlow had previously objected to developers plans 54 new properties near his home in 2017.

Planning chiefs claimed his plans would ‘extend the village’ into the open countryside ‘eroding the setting’

The Take That star purchased the 18th century Grade II-listed home in the quaint village of Alvescot, Oxfordshire, with his wife Dawn in 2007, for £2.3million. Pictured: image of the village not of Mr Barlow’s property

The parish council also objected to those plans at the time, arguing that the development would ‘destroy the sweeping vista across open country identified as a special characteristic of the village’.

The letter even singled out the pop star’s home, part of the picturesque village’s conservation area, saying the plans would ‘compromise its setting’.

The Mail on Sunday said that a woman representing Barlow attended a packed public meeting earlier this month where residents aired their fears.

Barlow also has a £20million home in west London.

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