Prince Philip is seen driving a carriage in rare footage

Prince Philip is seen guiding his fell ponies through water in rare action-packed footage of him competing at Royal Windsor Horse Trials that proves carriage driving is anything but sedate

  • Prince Philip is seen enthusiastically driving a carriage in this rare footage 
  • It is understood to have been captured at Royal Windsor Horse Trials in 1990 
  • The Queen’s husband of 73-years died aged 99 in Windsor, on April 9 

Prince Philip is seen enthusiastically driving a carriage in this rare footage, which is understood to have been captured at Royal Windsor Horse Trials in 1990. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, who died aged 99 in Windsor, on April 9, was captured seemingly putting all his effort into controlling his four beloved animals as they pulled his carriage through a body of water.

Then, the Queen’s husband of 73-years appeared to perfectly execute a walkabout of his horses while watched by a large audience.

The footage first appeared in the programme This Is Carriage Driving, produced in 1990, which delves into the world of the gentleman’s sport.

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Prince Philip is seen enthusiastically driving a carriage in this rare footage, which is understood to have been captured at Royal Windsor Horse Trials in 1990 (pictured)


The Duke of Edinburgh, who died aged 99 in Windsor, on April 9, was captured seemingly putting all his effort into controlling his four beloved animals as they pulled his carriage through a body of water

At the start of the clip, Prince Philip, dressed in appropriate attire, is surrounded by a team of three other people.

He leans towards the Fell ponies as he helps them travel through a body of water and up a steep hill. The duke then appears to expertly manoeuvre them down a bridge before turning them around in the water.

A second scene showcases Prince Philip sitting on his carriage while his beloved horses run around a field.

Earlier in the programme, the Duke of Edinburgh was interviewed about his favoured past time in his later years, which he helped become an international sport by developing the rules.

At the start of the clip, Prince Philip (pictured), dressed in appropriate attire, is surrounded by a team of three other people

He was also instrumental in getting the three-day event included in the Windsor Show in the 1970s.

Speaking on the programme, Prince Philip said: ‘I think the great thing about it, of course, is that in can so easily become a family sport. You know, husbands and wives and parents and children all sort of getting [into it].’

Carriage driving provided the duke with both a hobby to enjoy with family and friends — including fellow enthusiast Lady Penny Brabourne — and a sport to focus his competitive spirit.

He played a part in writing the rule book for the exhilarating equestrian sport and would regularly compete — even helping Britain to a world championship win in the grounds of Windsor in the 1980s.

Then, the Queen’s husband of 73-years appeared to perfectly execute a walkabout of his horses while watched by a large audience (pictured)

The footage first appeared in the programme This Is Carriage Driving, produced in 1990, which delves into the world of the gentleman’s sport

The Duke designed many of his own carriages, which he would regularly drive through the vast grounds of the royal estates, since the 1970s, after taking up the sport aged 50.

He was forced to give up polo in 1971 due to what he called his ‘dodgy’ arthritic wrist, and decided to find a new sport to concentrate on. 

‘I suppose I could have left it at that, but I have never felt comfortable as a spectator,’ he admitted.

Tennis, golf and squash were no good for his wrist and sailing would have taken him away from home at weekends.

‘It then suddenly occurred to me that this carriage-driving might be just the sport,’ Philip said.

Prince Philip’s beloved driving carriage that he designed himself was at his funeral in Windsor, on Saturday 17 April, with his hat and gloves on the seat (pictured)

Prince Philip’s beloved driving carriage that he designed himself was at his funeral in Windsor, on Saturday 17 April, with his hat and gloves on the seat.

The carriage, which the Duke of Edinburgh began using at the age of 91, was brought in to Windsor Castle by his rare Fell ponies — Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm.

The polished dark green four-wheeled carriage was pulled into the Quadrangle of the castle as the duke’s coffin was carried past on a specially designed Land Rover hearse.

His cap and gloves were laid in the drivers seat in a poignant tribute to the prince and one of his favourite hobbies.

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