How Kate and William are teaching ‘mischievous’ George he’s ‘not King just yet’

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Crestfallen Prince George could be seen sadly embracing mum Kate Middleton after England's devastating loss at Wembley last night.

Throughout the tense game, fans watched the young royal sing the national anthem, jump out of his seat and grin hopefully at football fan dad, William.

In the last fortnight, seven-year-old George's suited and booted mini-me outings have offered a glimpse into the future king's character. He's appeared playful but grown-up and clearly in awe of his 'hero' dad.

Now a royal expert tells OK! how Kate and William are keeping 'mischievous' Prince George down-to-earth, and preventing the "goldfish bowl" experience of the monarchy from turning him into "a complete lunatic".

"Although Prince George might be future King of the Castle, he's not King of the Castle yet," Duncan Larcombe tells OK!.

"He's not Little Lord Fauntleroy. He's a rascal (almost) eight year old – full of mischief and always playing tricks and pranks on his younger sister and brother."

"You can see that George is full of beans and full of fun," Duncan continues. "And if William and Kate get this right with him, he could literally have the world's greatest upbringing because he wouldn't have to worry about things that might worry a normal eight year old, like daddy hasn't got his job anymore, or mummy's stressed about Covid.

"The bind of normal life and those stresses about money and work, and even health, because they have their own doctor, aren't things the Cambridges need to worry about.

"Their disadvantage is that they have to try and come to terms somehow with living up to the expectation of being chosen by God to rule over the country.

"Hopefully George can enjoy all the benefits of Royal life, but without the extraordinary, weird impact of growing up in a goldfish bowl.

"You have to almost sympathise with William and Kate because when you look at all the fairytales children are still read when they are kids, they're all about the handsome prince and the happily ever after, which means many little kids still dream of it.

"How will Kate explain to George that he is the handsome prince and one of the characters in a real life fairytale?

"They will have to explain the extraordinary circumstances he's been born into and hope as a result his head doesn't pop and he doesn't become a complete lunatic, as has happened to some members of his family."

Last night's match was George's second international game after watching England's historic win over Germany.

It's fair to say he has experienced the full range of emotions associated with supporting England in just two matches, and seeing him uncomposed delighted royal fans.

"Members of the royal family are so shielded now," Duncan says. "There's a lot more privacy and the kids live behind that shield.

"They've also been in lockdown so it's been 18 months of William, Kate and the three kids, the beach, Norfolk, marshmallows… a very shielded situation where their individual characters can remain quite secret.

"Until now, almost everything we've seen of George has been exactly what Kate and William have wanted us to see. But seeing him at the football, acting like an excited kid, was lovely, especially as he didn't appear to have the weight of the world on his shoulders.

"We know when he turned seven his parents told him about, as Harry would put it, the 'curse 'of his birthright and told him he will be King one day.

"But he doesn't appear to be a little sod who has let it all go to his head. He looks normal and this was Kate and William's promise to all of their kids.

"William's perception of normal is based entirely on the Middleton family – kids, a dog, a garden, wax jackets and wellies, and a nice roast on a Sunday, which is great because while that's not all of our experiences of normal life, that's still a very loving and normal example of it.

"Future kings of old would have been brought up with tutors shipped in from Hamburg, and if they did sport it would be hunting and killing animals in the back garden, but George is mixing with ordinary kids. Admittedly, it's an extraordinary school, but it's still refreshing to see.

"George has a passion for volcanoes and Earth science, but he's also a huge football fan, as we saw last night."

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