Naomi Campbell Slams ‘Angry Black Woman’ Stereotype

The supermodel makes use of her interview for the November 2020 issue of Vogue to end the racist, sexist ‘angry black woman’ stereotype about herself after she receives backlash for speaking out.

AceShowbizNaomi Campbell refuses to be labeled as an “angry black woman” any longer. Having shouldered the stigma for her outspokenness throughout her decades long career, the first black woman to cover French Vogue in 1988 made use of a new magazine interview to end the racist and sexist stereotype about herself.

The 50-year-old was asked to weigh in on the portrayal of her as an “angry black woman” during a cover interview for Vogue’s November 2020 issue. Unhesitatingly, she responded by declaring, “I am quite over it.” She then asked, “Is it now that we have permission to speak? Well, I have always spoken.”

“There were a few things that I would do when I was younger that I was told were bad for my race,” the supermodel went on to make her point. “Now the things I do are not just for me anymore. I think more of my culture and my race, as opposed to thinking about just me.”

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During the discussion, Naomi also talked about her campaign for black representations in the modelling industry. “I never used to say the word racism; I just used to say, it’s territorialism,” she pointed out. “I never wanted people to say that I used that as an excuse, that I was throwing that word out.”

“Now I’m happy that everyone’s all on the same page, that everyone feels comfortable to come out about their experiences without feeling some stigma,” she continued sharing her thoughts. “But for me, nothing’s changed. I’m going to speak the same way.”

On the topic of her being misunderstood by the British media, Naomi commented, “I see they’d rather write some trash thing that you’ve done, rather than the good that you’ve done. When I was younger it used to upset me, but it doesn’t now.” She added, “I’m not looking for those validations anymore. But I am still a little skeptical about doing interviews in England.”

“They haven’t learned how to be not-racist, period! I’d rather have racism be right in front of my face and know what I’m dealing with, than to have it suppressed,” she claimed. “No disrespect to the country I was born in, but we need to dig it up and bring it up and deal with it. No more chucking it down the sides.”

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